After Charleston: Where Do We Go from Here?

In a moving eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinkney last week, President Obama called us to have hope, and to reach for “that reservoir of goodness” in our treatment of one another. He also challenged us not to settle for symbolic gestures, but to do the hard work that will lead to real change. For our July program, we will show

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Flags and songs that bring us together or tear us apart

The flag of post-apartheid South Africa integrates the colors of the African National Congress, Dutch Tricolor, Union, and Transvaal vierkleur. Can we raise a unifying flag over the American South?

Have you ever heard the national anthem of South Africa? It’s an amazing piece that integrates five languages (Xhosa, Zulu, Sesotho, Afrikaans and English) and the anthems of the black liberation movement (“Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika”) and the former white-dominated regime (“Die Stem van Suid-Afrika”). I believe it’s the only national anthem that begins and ends in different keys. Listening to

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After Charleston: Where Do We Go from Here?

Join us on Saturday, July 11: 10am NAACP General Membership Meeting 11am Public program: “After Charleston: Where Do We Go from Here?” In his moving eulogy for Reverend Clementa Pinkney, President Obama called us to have hope, and to reach for “that reservoir of goodness” in our treatment of one another. He also challenged us not to settle for symbolic

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Candlelight Vigil & Stand Against Racism: Wednesday 8pm

The Jackson County NC NAACP invites you to attend a candlelight vigil in Sylva, NC, on Wednesday June 24 @ 8pm–one week after the killing of the innocent parishioners of the Emanuel AME Church. We will gather at the Courthouse Fountain on Main Street, below Jackson County Public Library, to mourn for those who lost their lives in Charleston and

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Charleston, South Carolina, Emanuel AME Church Shooting

The Jackson County Branch of the NAACP joins our president Cornell Brooks in expressing outrage over the killing of the innocent parishioners of the Emanuel AME Church yesterday. This is a clear act of terrorism against African American churches and our communities, and we hope that the perpetrator will be brought to justice. Please read the statement of our own

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